1. Reblogged from: circuitslave
  2. bigblueboo:

    crystal planet

    Reblogged from: witchhousepoland
  3. ifuckingloveminerals:

Andradite
Dal’negorsk, Kavalerovo Mining District, Primorskiy Kray, Far-Eastern Region, Russia

    ifuckingloveminerals:

    Andradite

    Dal’negorsk, Kavalerovo Mining District, Primorskiy Kray, Far-Eastern Region, Russia

    Reblogged from: ifuckingloveminerals
  4. Reblogged from: randomghost
  5. skinned-teen:

Psychokinesis
Nina Kulagina was a Russian woman who was claimed to have psychic powers, particularly in psychokinesis. She first recognized her ability, which she believed she had inherited from her mother, when she realized that items spontaneously moved around her when she was angry. 
Found to have an intense magnetic field surrounding her, as well as powerful brain waves, Nina Kulagina spent a good amount of time under close observation, as she is reported to have been able to move small objects without touching them. She also demonstrated the power to manipulate cells and organs. During one observation, she was able to alter the beating of a frog’s heart, first increasing the heart rate, then slowing it, and finally stopping it.
Nina was always aware that she had unusual powers. She could mentally see things inside people’s pockets, and when she met sick people she could identify the disease they were suffering from, an image of the illness appearing in her mind. On one occasion when she was in a particularly angry mood, she was walking towards a cupboard in her apartment when a jug in the cupboard suddenly moved to the edge of the shelf, fell and smashed to pieces on the floor. After that, changes began to take place in her apartment. Lights went on and off; objects became animated and seemed somehow to be attracted to her. It was similar to having a poltergeist, but Nina knew the energy was coming from her, and discovered that, if she tried, she could control it. In 1964, while in hospital recovering from a nervous breakdown, Nina spent a lot of time sewing. Doctors were amazed when they saw that she was able to reach into her sewing basket and choose any colour of thread she needed without looking at it. Local parapsychologists were contacted and the following year, when she had fully recovered, she agreed to take part in various experiments. Nina was tested and it was found that she could indeed ‘see’ colours with her fingertips, bringing to mind Rosa Kuleshova, a school teacher from the Ural Mountains, who also possessed this talent. Kulagina also had extraordinary healing powers, she could, for example, make wounds heal up simply by holding her hand above them. She was also tested for Psychokinesis (PK) and the results were so remarkable that, in order to keep her real identity secret, she was obliged for many years to use the pseudonym of Nelya Mikhailova. Nina would sit at a table and stare at a small object, such as a matchbox or a wineglass, and make it move without touching it. Apparently her powers did not come straight away, hours of preparation may be needed, which, as sceptics have pointed out, does not favour the setting up of strictly supervised demonstrations. In order to move things with mind power alone she found she had to clear all other thoughts from her head, and told investigators that when her concentration was successful, there was a sharp pain in her spine, and her eyesight blurred. Nina practiced hard, focusing her powers, and was soon able to move matchsticks, fountain pens and compass needles. 
read more , watch video

    skinned-teen:

    Psychokinesis

    Nina Kulagina was a Russian woman who was claimed to have psychic powers, particularly in psychokinesis. She first recognized her ability, which she believed she had inherited from her mother, when she realized that items spontaneously moved around her when she was angry. 

    Found to have an intense magnetic field surrounding her, as well as powerful brain waves, Nina Kulagina spent a good amount of time under close observation, as she is reported to have been able to move small objects without touching them. She also demonstrated the power to manipulate cells and organs. During one observation, she was able to alter the beating of a frog’s heart, first increasing the heart rate, then slowing it, and finally stopping it.

    Nina was always aware that she had unusual powers. She could mentally see things inside people’s pockets, and when she met sick people she could identify the disease they were suffering from, an image of the illness appearing in her mind. On one occasion when she was in a particularly angry mood, she was walking towards a cupboard in her apartment when a jug in the cupboard suddenly moved to the edge of the shelf, fell and smashed to pieces on the floor. After that, changes began to take place in her apartment. Lights went on and off; objects became animated and seemed somehow to be attracted to her. It was similar to having a poltergeist, but Nina knew the energy was coming from her, and discovered that, if she tried, she could control it. 

    In 1964, while in hospital recovering from a nervous breakdown, Nina spent a lot of time sewing. Doctors were amazed when they saw that she was able to reach into her sewing basket and choose any colour of thread she needed without looking at it. Local parapsychologists were contacted and the following year, when she had fully recovered, she agreed to take part in various experiments. Nina was tested and it was found that she could indeed ‘see’ colours with her fingertips, bringing to mind Rosa Kuleshova, a school teacher from the Ural Mountains, who also possessed this talent. 

    Kulagina also had extraordinary healing powers, she could, for example, make wounds heal up simply by holding her hand above them. She was also tested for Psychokinesis (PK) and the results were so remarkable that, in order to keep her real identity secret, she was obliged for many years to use the pseudonym of Nelya Mikhailova. 

    Nina would sit at a table and stare at a small object, such as a matchbox or a wineglass, and make it move without touching it. Apparently her powers did not come straight away, hours of preparation may be needed, which, as sceptics have pointed out, does not favour the setting up of strictly supervised demonstrations. In order to move things with mind power alone she found she had to clear all other thoughts from her head, and told investigators that when her concentration was successful, there was a sharp pain in her spine, and her eyesight blurred. Nina practiced hard, focusing her powers, and was soon able to move matchsticks, fountain pens and compass needles. 

    read more , watch video

    Reblogged from: skinned-teen
  6. thisisnojay:

time crisis, vol. 4

    thisisnojay:

    time crisis, vol. 4

    Reblogged from: thisisnojay
  7. sekigan:

Concept Art by Brenoch Adams | Concept/digital art | Pinterest
    Reblogged from: cypulchre
  8. Graham Bandt-Law
    GBL || 2013 
    Initial Design by Kevin Lowry
    Diamond Pave by Adam Ramseyer
    Tourmaline
    Tanzanite
    Benitoite
    Sapphire
    Diamond
    18k/14k/.925

  9. THE STANDARD MODEL

    one more tab i can close

  10. shamanshendu:

    bukakkemonogatari:

    image

    ANAL BOOTY AND POKEMON! I HAVE TO GO HOME RIGHT NOW IMMEDIATELY

    gun
    jobs
    gayfanfics

    ok.



    Reblogged from: shamanshendu
  11. Reblogged from: thecybernomicon
  12. “There are two great mysteries that overshadow all other mysteries in science. One is the origin of the universe. That’s my day job. However, there is also the other great mystery of inner space. And that is what sits on your shoulders, which believe it or not, is the most complex object in the known universe. But the brain only uses 20 watts of power. It would require a nuclear power plant to energise a computer the size of a city block to mimic your brain, and your brain does it with just 20 watts. So if someone calls you a dim bulb, that’s a compliment.”

    “There are two great mysteries that overshadow all other mysteries in science. One is the origin of the universe. That’s my day job. However, there is also the other great mystery of inner space. And that is what sits on your shoulders, which believe it or not, is the most complex object in the known universe. But the brain only uses 20 watts of power. It would require a nuclear power plant to energise a computer the size of a city block to mimic your brain, and your brain does it with just 20 watts. So if someone calls you a dim bulb, that’s a compliment.”

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